Data Protection

All information held about patients is completely confidential. The Practice is registered under the Data Protection Act 1984. This Act protects data held on the computer system.

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CONFIDENTIALITY

In order to ensure that you get the best possible continuity of medical care we keep records of every consultation. Your written records are locked away when the surgery is shut and your computer records can only be accessed via unique passwords. Your records are managed in accordance with the Data Protection Act. All doctors and their staff are governed by strict rules of confidentiality about patient information. No information given to us can be divulged to anyone outside the surgery unless you give us written permission to do so. We cannot give out any information about you to friends, family, partners, employers, police, social services, Benefits Agencies, insurance companies, solicitors etc without your agreement or unless we are legally obliged to do so (e.g. under a Court Order).

Unfortunately, at times this may mean that the receptionist might appear to be withholding information, but they are following the guidelines and are not trying to be obstructive. Your understanding of this matter would be appreciated.

You have a right of access to your own records should you wish to read them and you are also entitled to see any written reports about you before they are sent.

Guide to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)

For More Information - https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-the-general-data-protection-regulation-gdpr/

Data Protection impact Assessments

At a Glance

  • A Data Protection Impact Assessment (DPIA) is a process to help you identify and minimise the data protection risks of a project.
  • You must do a DPIA for processing that is likely to result in a high risk to individuals. This includes some specified types of processing. You can use our screening checklists to help you decide when to do a DPIA.
  • It is also good practice to do a DPIA for any other major project which requires the processing of personal data.
  • Your DPIA must:
    • describe the nature, scope, context and purposes of the processing;
    • assess necessity, proportionality and compliance measures;
    • identify and assess risks to individuals; and
    • identify any additional measures to mitigate those risks.
  • To assess the level of risk, you must consider both the likelihood and the severity of any impact on individuals. High risk could result from either a high probability of some harm, or a lower possibility of serious harm.
  • You should consult your data protection officer (if you have one) and, where appropriate, individuals and relevant experts. Any processors may also need to assist you.
  • If you identify a high risk that you cannot mitigate, you must consult the ICO before starting the processing.
  • If you are processing for law-enforcement purposes, you should read this alongside the Guide to Law Enforcement Processing.
  • The ICO will give written advice within eight weeks, or 14 weeks in complex cases. If appropriate, we may issue a formal warning not to process the data, or ban the processing altogether.

For more information please visit https://ico.org.uk/for-organisations/guide-to-data-protection/guide-to-the-general-data-protection-regulation-gdpr/accountability-and-governance/data-protection-impact-assessments/

Your Neighbourhood Professionals. Just a Click Away! Starline 2000
Your Neighbourhood Professionals. Just a Click Away! Starline 2000